Saturday, April 22, 2017

Real Deal Dude Ranch

Remote, rustic and real were the qualities I was looking for in a dude ranch in Colorado.  The Laramie River Ranch, a small spread sitting on the banks of cooling river in the middle of vast plains backed by snow-capped mountains, looks perfect. Situated near the Wyoming border, the ranch shares the wide open spaces of it's neighbor.
Owners Krista and Bill have small children so family values are a hallmark of the ranch. There are lots of activities for kids so adults can ride out for the day without a care.


Since publishing my book TheCowgirl Jumped Over the Moon,
I have become immersed in the horse world once again.  Twenty years ago I owned my own mare and we galloped over hill and dale until the sun slipped behind ridge of the Santa Monica Mountains surrounding our barn. I loved those days and cherish all the adventures I had with my best girlfriend. Becoming re-acquainted with the horse world through the works of other authors has made me want to get back in the saddle.
I am so looking forward to my stay at the Laramie River Ranch where horseback riding is the specialty. I don’t need high end amenities, I need to re-connect with nature riding on the back of a good horse in gorgeous country.  Yeehaw!!

Full report when I return.

Earthiest's Creed

In the words of Edward Abbey…I am not an atheist, I am an Earthiest!

Earthiests are people who literally need to plug into the planet to recharge. Whether sitting on a rock warmed by the sun,
or face planted down on the sand at the beach, standing on a mountain top arms spread with palms up to gather energy, or resting against a tree, I am gathering energy from the earth.


 Some people think nothing is happening when they are sitting still because their minds are too busy to feel anything. But, they are receiving nature’s gift just the same.  An earthiest consciously makes themselves more receptive to the bounty by quieting their minds and will not miss an opportunity to plug into the universal gas pump! 
 Adventure-travel writer, Linda Ballou, has a host of travel articles on her site, along with information about her travel memoir, Lost Angel Walkabout-One Traveler’s Tales, her historical novel Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i and her latest action-adventure novel The Cowgirl Jumped over the Moon at-www.LindaBallouAuthor.com.  


 Subscribe to her blog www.LindaBallouTalkingtoyou.com and receive updates on her books, and travel destinations.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Sitting Chilly on a Ride to Justice

Flamingo Road (Fia Mckee Mysteries #1)Flamingo Road by Sasscer Hill
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Like all of Lynda Sasscer Hill’s stories Flamingo Road is set in the dark underbelly of the horse-racing world. I stopped going to the track when I saw a horse break its leg in half from the stress of being run too hard before bones were formed. Sickened by the sight of the animal being put down in front of me, I determined never to return even though I love the pageantry and beauty of fine specimens in their prime. But, we learn it is not always what it seems as Lynda shares the inside dope, [no pun intended] on what goes on behind the scenes in the racing world. Her plotting is fast-paced filled with many head-spinning sucker punches that keep the reader riveted. Protagonist, Fia Mckee, is an under cover agent who exercises thoroughbreds by day and seduces gangsters by night. Both endeavors are worrisome. In between she is trying to work things out with her estranged brother and his horse crazy teenage daughter. They are both trying to deal with the desertion of their mother and the murder of their father. Sasscer Hill ties the story together in a pretty bow in the end that makes you feel satisfied, and yearning for more, which I’m certain is in the offing.


View all my reviews

Since publishing The Cowgirl Jumped Over the Moon, I have been having fun reviewing other equine authors. This is one of the best so far.

Monday, April 17, 2017

The Cowgirl Jumped Over the Moon in the Ribbons


It was quite a leap of faith for me to publish this story.  Writing it was part of my own healing process when I had to give up riding due to an injury. I am so pleased that The Cowgirl Jumped Over the Moon is a finalist in the Indie Excellence Awards.  For it to receive this recognition is quite on honor.
Cowgirl has garnered numerous 5-Star reviews on Amazon and Goodreads from horse lovers, and general readers alike. I am marketing it under the genre “New Adult”, but the story can fall under “Women’s Fiction”, or even “Western Romance.” Here are some of my favorite comments from readers
**Horses. Romance. Adventure - who could need anything more from a book?

** I could smell the leather and sweat, feel the wind buffeting the flags at the shows, hear the whispers of the trees when Gemcie was out in the trail.

** Her writing is so descriptive that you feel you are in the saddle and experiencing everything Gemcie does. The words describing the amazing mountains makes you able to feel the wind and smell the rain.

While writing The Grand Prix jumping scenes in Cowgirl I kept a vision of Susan Hutchison in my mind. She is an incredible rider whose slogan is “No Guts-No Glory.” I saw her riding Samsung Woodstock in the 90’s when they were on their way to World Cup. She kindly agreed to an interview that appeared in the California Riding Magazine. The timing was auspicious because she was inducted into the Jumper Hall of Fame in 2016.


I especially enjoyed my conversation with Diann Adamson Can WeTalk”  that appeared in her newsletter Le Cour di l’ Artiste.

The Response to my storyand interview with Le Romantique, a site hosted by a Canadian teen, was important to me because I wanted to know if my book held appeal for the younger audience.


Cowgirl went Down Under in an interview with Christine Meunier, author of the Free Rein Series


A fantastic write-up and endorsement for my book appeared on Equine Addiction in Sept. 2016


Gina McKnight of Riding and Writing Fame spotlighted me on her blog early on.

I am grateful for all the enthusiastic support that The Cowgirl Jumped Over the Moon is receiving and can't wait to get back in the saddle myself for more riding adventures. Cheers, Linda

Adventure-travel writer, Linda Ballou, has a host of travel articles on her site, along with information about her travel memoir, Lost Angel Walkabout-One Traveler’s Tales, her historical novel Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i and her latest action-adventure novel The Cowgirl Jumped over the Moon at-www.LindaBallouAuthor.com.  

 Subscribe to her blog www.LindaBallouTalkingtoyou.com and receive updates on her books, and travel destinations.



Wednesday, April 12, 2017

How writing Cowgirl helped me deal with loss.

I wrote The Cowgirl Jumped Over the Moon standing up at my breakfast bar. A tingling sensation in my lower back had turned into a debilitating condition brought on by a herniated disc that brought me to my knees and would not allow me to sit.  For six weeks I wore knee pads to crawl from my bed to the refrigerator and took my meals lying on my belly. This injury forced me to give up the riding world that I loved.  At that time, I was busy fulfilling my dream of competing in the jumping arena and doing three-day events with my headstrong little mare. She was my best friend and we had many wonderful adventures together. One of my favorites was rising at dawn on Easter morning and galloping across the top of ridge beneath pearly skies.  I can still feel the joyous sensation of being one with her powerful body—heartbeat to heartbeat.



My way of dealing with the terrible loss I felt was to write this story. Gemcie’s world is turned upside down when she is injured while jumping her horse. She loses everything and needs to be alone to sort out what has happened. She turns inward on a solo horse trek in the high Sierra’s that John Muir loved so well. This opens the door to a whole new world for her that helps her connect with what is most important to her.
Adventure-travel writer, Linda Ballou, has a host of travel articles on her site, along with information about her travel memoir, Lost Angel Walkabout-One Traveler’s Tales, her historical novel Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i and her latest action-adventure novel The Cowgirl Jumped over the Moon at-www.LindaBallouAuthor.com.  Subscribe to my blog www.LindaBallouTalkingtoyou.com and receive updates on her books, and travel destinations.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

The Best of Times with Bobo

While living on the north shore of Kauai, I got a job as a cub reporter at the Kauai Garden Island
Napali Coast Kauai
News.
  This gave me access to people on the Island I found noteworthy.  Suzanne “Bobo” Bollins, who lived at the notorious Taylor Camp (1969-1978) where young people fleeing the Viet Nam war and materialism of the mainland were living out the ultimate hippie fantasies, seemed a good prospect. It was said that Bobo swam the tumultuous waters of the Napali Coast wearing only a belt with a pouch containing a dry pareau for when she reached the shore. This seemed quite a miraculous feat to me, so I made an appointment to interview her.
She welcomed me in her tree house abode with a glass of Merlot. She told me that dolphin often played with her on her swims from Ke’e Beach to Kalalau Valley—some eleven miles away. She said she felt their intelligence when they came close to look her in the eye.  She seemed perfectly at ease in her Spartan quarters, forerunner to the “Tiny House” movement today.  Her brown skin was weathered from the sun and a thick braid of golden hair went to her waist. Stories of the residents cavorting nude were over-stated, she told me. She was wearing a sarong tied at the shoulder in the early Hawaiian kikepa style, and said regular clothes were worn by residents in the evenings to fend off mosquitoes.
 She was highly animated in the telling of her month-long stays in the valley held sacred by Hawaiians, but abruptly stopped short to announce that the lava rocks in the canvas-domed sauna just outside her door were ready. This was to be an evening of sharing with the other residents in the camp. Bobo offered me a hit off of a joint of the most powerful pot I have ever run into in my life, and asked me if I would like to join them in a ceremony celebrating Earth Mother. Curious minds want to know, so I stripped to my undies and joined the group wearing no more than their birthday suits. We sat in a circle around the steaming crimson rocks holding hands while chanting a reverberating Om.  The heat generated by the cauldron of molten rocks combined with the intense communal sharing of energy brought me to a feverish crescendo. I stumbled out of the sauna, and planted myself face down in the frigid mountain stream running through the camp to cool off.  Energy shot through the top of my head like a comet, leaving my mind as clear as the sparkling heavens above.

At that time, the highly romanticized camp of peace and love hippies, glorified in coffee table books today, was nearing an end. Elizabeth Taylor’s brother, Howard who owned seven acres of beach front property had originally allowed a group of thirteen disenfranchised youth from San Francisco to build their camp on Ke’e Beach. Soon, there were over 120 people, including women with small children living at the camp. The residents of Taylor Camp who did not pay taxes, lived on welfare and food stamps, soon found themselves at odds with the locals. What’s more native Hawaiians didn’t like the desecration of the Kalalau Valley by hippies camped there. It was rumored that home boys had put a dead pig upstream the week before my visit to contaminate the water and encourage the tree-house people to move on.

Still, I admired Bobo for her extreme bravery and athleticism.  At the time I did not know that I had found the inspiration for the dolphin that would be the loyal friend of my heroine in Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i.  It is fascinating to witness how life experiences boomerang into an artist’s consciousness and appear in their work. Many Wai-nani readers view her relationship with a dolphin family as fantastic. The truth is that all of the interaction between my heroine, and her best friend--a bottle nose dolphin, is real. That is to say, I researched the behavior of dolphins and their relationship with humans throughout history to bring authenticity to the story.  A documentary film detailing life in Taylor Camp was released in the Islands. Bobo’s granddaughter, Natalie Noble, stars in the film swimming alone in the buff along the majestic Napali Coast. I suspect there are dolphins playing in her wake.
Adventure-travel writer, Linda Ballou, has a host of travel articles on her site, along with information about her travel memoir, Lost Angel Walkabout-One Traveler’s Tales, her historical novel Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i and her latest action-adventure novel The Cowgirl Jumped over the Moon at-www.LindaBallouAuthor.com.  Subscribe to my blog www.LindaBallouTalkingtoyou.com and receive updates on her books, and travel destinations.


Sunday, March 26, 2017

Eye-popping Blooms on the La Jolla Loop

No need to drive to Palmdale to see poppies flame the hills in the spring. Instead, head 22 miles west of Malibu Canyon on PCH to the La Jolla Canyon Trailhead.  Behind the parking lot is a hill covered with lupine and bright orange poppies.
Most families with small children stop at the base of the waterfall about ¾ miles into the trail.  The boulder-step hike beyond the fall winds up the narrow gorge overlooking the streambed with willows and black walnut alive with birdsong.
Higher up, the canyon wall is blanketed with the shaggy trunks of the Giant Coreoposis bursting with bright yellow clumps of daisies from Feb-May.
 Soon the trail levels off through a tree tunnel of lavender-blue California Lilac.



It takes you to a pond lined in with pussy willows. Nestled among the spreading coastal oak near the pond are picnic tables that invite the hiker to take a rest and enjoy lunch alfresco. Nearby is an overnight campsite. The more ambitious hiker can veer to the right and loop back on the Overlook Trail, or go left on the less traveled La Jolla Loop. Either trail is graced with spectacular vistas of Bony Mountain Ridge and the coast.
The Chumash used these trails to make inland migrations to the 600 acre expanse of grassland on the summit. Find Serenity in this back-country meadow where they collected native needle grass to build domed-shaped huts.  Mugu State Park is much the same as it was before the arrival of the Spanish in 1542. The 7000-year-old trail system connects to Rancho Sierra Vista and the Indian Cultural Center in Newbury Park.

The closet stop for a hungry hiker is Neptune’ Net, a biker hangout located between the trail head and Leo Carrillo on PCH, with live lobster and crab in the tank and burgers and fries in a basket.

Adventure-travel writer, Linda Ballou, has a host of travel articles on her site, along with information about her travel memoir, Lost Angel Walkabout-One Traveler’s Tales, her historical novel Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i and her latest action-adventure novel The Cowgirl Jumped over the Moon at-www.LindaBallouAuthor.com.  Subscribe to my blog www.LindaBallouTalkingtoyou.com and receive updates on her books, and travel destinations.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Spur Jingling Interview with Carly Kade

Friday, March 17, 2017

Remembering Ka'ahumanu on her Birthday

Happy Birthday to Ka’ahumanu the most powerful woman in old Hawai’i


On March 17, 1768 (some say 1777) Ka’ahumanu was born in a cave at the fortress hill of Ka’uiki in Hana. The fierce Moi of Maui, once her mother’s lover, became so enraged when she chose Ke’eamuoku over him that he set his warriors upon her parents. They chased them through Haleakala Crater, but lost them in thick mountain forests. While Ka’ahumanu was still a baby her parents fled from Hana to Hawai’i where they lived in royal comfort. Wai-nani, A Voice from old Hawai’i my historical novel (1750-1819) is inspired by the life of the precocious Chiefess Ka’ahumanu. To some she is remembered as the” loving mother of the people” and to others she is the “flaw that brought down the chiefdom.”


Brave, athletic, strong, passionate, caring and centered in herself, I saw her as a forerunner of the modern woman. It was a tremendous gift to be given the opportunity to visit the cave where she was born.  It took the entire crew of six members of the Hana Canoe Club to paddle me to her birthplace.  We pointed the tip of the outrigger into the oncoming waves that sloshed over the bow and paddled through the foaming surf to the protected shallow waters lapping at the lava rocks beneath Ka’ahumanu’s birth place. I climbed the jagged black lava to a path that led to a large opening with two indentations big enough to accommodate a human.  Her mother enjoyed a lovely view of Hana Bay and the green mountains floating on the horizon. Offerings of flowers were placed in front of the cave. Before leaving I floated in the waters at the foot of her cave considered to be healing by those who come here for sacred ceremonies.


 Big Mahalo to friend and fellow author, Lorraine Brodek, for fulfilling my desire to visit the sacred birthplace of the woman that inspired my novel Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i 
  
Written With Warm Aloha

In the Name of Ka’ahumanu

Adventure-travel writer, Linda Ballou, has a host of travel articles on her site, along with information about her travel memoir, Lost Angel Walkabout-One Traveler’s Tales, her historical novel Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i and her latest action-adventure novel The Cowgirl Jumped over the Moon at-www.LindaBallouAuthor.com.  Subscribe to my blog www.LindaBallouTalkingtoyou.com and receive updates on her books, and travel destinations.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Hidden Gems on Highway One in the Central Coast of CA






Heading up  the Highway 1 Discovery Route north of Morro Bay just past Villa Creek Road, I discovered a less-traveled hike at the Harmony Headlands that leads you through a meadow livened by birdsong to a wild walk along coastal bluffs.
If you go when morning mists are rising you will spot hawks, finches, meadow larks and more. The scent of sage and meadow grasses float on the air. This is a mellow walk on a well-groomed trail with a couple of benches where you can sit a spell and enjoy canyon views. When you reach the shore, you may run into a few local joggers on the bluff walk, but you will mostly have it to yourself. Keep your eyes peeled for a small parking lot and sign that says coastal access. There is no fee to park here.

 After you walk drive up the coast just beyond
Cambria to Exotic Garden Drive that takes you to a great lunch stop. Seating arrangements of all kinds are scattered around grounds bursting with all manner of blooms dotted with sculptures and other artistic creations.  A casual food counter serves dishes prepared from fresh local ingredients that can be taken outdoors and enjoyed in the garden. You can purchase plants here and browse the gift shop.


If you haven’t been to Hearst Castle, a stop at the spot the newspaper magnate chose for his elaborate estate warrants a visit.  It sits on one of the last undeveloped stretches of coast that begs you to stroll the sands at San Simeon State Park. The beef in the pancake-sized hamburgers at the Sebastians winetasting room and cafĂ© (walking distance from the beach) comes from local grass fed Hearst Ranch cattle.
Sebastians Cafe and wine tasting room


Click for more adventures on the Highway One Discovery Route 


Adventure-travel writer, Linda Ballou, has a host of travel articles on her site, along with information about her travel memoir, Lost Angel Walkabout-One Traveler’s Tales, her historical novel Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i and her latest action-adventure novel The Cowgirl Jumped over the Moon at-www.LindaBallouAuthor.com.  Subscribe to my blog www.LindaBallouTalkingtoyou.com and receive updates on her books, and travel destinations.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Romancing the Soul

                 How about spending some time romancing your soul?

Humans do not “save beauty”; rather beauty saves us. Gretel Ehrlich



The soul craves beauty. It wants to be in the world and to breathe in crisp air, to smell the sweet tang of orange blossoms and to know the happy faces of poppies in the spring.The sight of patches of yellow canyon daisies blanketing the meadows brighten the psyche, lifting the gauze of depression that can set in with too much of doing what must be done.


The soul is refreshed when the body is in motion with blood pumping to muscles awakened in a brisk walk.

 The soul wants to see, to feel, to absorb, to touch, and to be alive. The soul seeks balance and harmony. It wants equilibrium and finds it in nature, in art, and in music. To keep the rust off your soul and your spirits soaring, seek out beauty in each of your precious days.

Adventure-travel writer, Linda Ballou, has a host of travel articles on her site, along with information about her travel memoir, Lost Angel Walkabout-One Traveler’s Tales, her historical novel Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i and her latest action-adventure novel The Cowgirl Jumped over the Moon at-www.LindaBallouAuthor.com.  Subscribe to my blog www.LindaBallouTalkingtoyou.com and receive updates on her books, and travel destinations.




Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Sweetheart Deal for Hawai'i Lovers


                      Sweetheart Deal for Hawai'i Lovers

Gift of Wai-nani's Wayfinder with Purchase on my site www.LindaBallouAuthor.com



In need of a great  gift for your friends who love books and Hawaii? I love Linda Ballou's novel Wai-nani. A beautifully written story about a strong woman in ancient Hawaii who leaves her family to follow her heart. It's got everything: romance, action, adventure, Hawaiian history and culture. It really brings ancient Hawaii to life in a can't-put-down drama. 

Linda, it warms my heart that you have taken the time to learn so much about the Hawaiian history and culture I love. Thank you for transferring that knowledge into such a beautifully written novel. Jennifer Crites- Former Editor of Aloha Magazine and Long time resident of Honolulu


Wai-nani's Wayfinder is my gift to you with the purchase of Wai-nani:  A Voice from Old Hawai'i on my site Linda Ballou Author.com

Gift wrapped if purchase is for your sweetheart!


                                             

Monday, January 30, 2017

The Whale Trail Story


  When whales burst from the sea in joyful exhilaration they humble us with their awesome power.  Making the longest migrations of any mammal on earth from chill waters of Alaska to Baja California they rely on ancient knowledge to guide through treacherous seas. Today their challenges are greater than ever from congested, noisy shipping lanes, to pollutants and plastic in our oceans. The creation of the Whale Trail with over sixty designated viewing sites on the Pacific Coast from British Columbia to California is an attempt to bring greater sensitivity to the needs of the largest, and oldest creatures on our planet to survive.


Six viewing sites have been identified on the Central Coast of California; in San Simeon; Moonstone Beach in Cambria, the pier at Cayucos; the bluff trail in Montana de oro State Park; the Avila Pier and at the Oceano Dunes Overlook at Grand Avenue.

I visited the Piadras Lighthouse in San Simeon that sits on a lonely peninsula jutting out in to rough seas crashing over sea stacks. Docents led tours through the manicured grounds garner good viewing spots for a variety of marine life, including the whales during migrations. A fluffy otter was floating on his back oblivious to crashing waves while Elephant Seals lay sprawled on the shore. 


Adventure-travel writer, Linda Ballou, has a host of travel articles on her site, along with information about her travel memoir, Lost Angel Walkabout-One Traveler’s Tales, her historical novel Wai-nani, A Voice from Old Hawai’i and her latest action-adventure novel The Cowgirl Jumped over the Moon at-www.LindaBallouAuthor.com.  

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Rancho Del Oso – Where Redwoods Meet the Sea

Waddell Beach is a wild stretch of surf eighteen miles north of Santa Cruz on Highway One. I was driving to San Francisco from L. A. when the rust colored meadow with its muted mauve and lavender grasses lacing the winding sea-bound creek called to me. Flashes of ducks, geese, and other shorebirds stirred my birding instincts. I yearned to know the valley that stretches from the beach into the redwood basin better, so when I visited friends in nearby Felton during the holidays, I asked them to share this
treasure.
Rancho Del Oso Nature Preserve turned out to be a local favorite. An easy, wide trail winds through beach, marsh, stream, and a riparian corridor. Self-guided trail maps can be easily obtained at the nature center about a half-mile into the park. Guided walks are provided on the weekends by docents. A horse camp is available for equestrians who bring their own mounts. Along with the equestrian trails in the park are trails for hikers and bikers. Monterey pines, mixed woodland, redwoods, coastal scrub, and mountain chaparral create a collage of color and shapes fringing the broad meadow of the Theodore Hoover National Preserve bordering Waddell Beach Park.
Most hikers are content to take the lower trail from the beach up to Berry Creek Falls, felt by many to be the most beautiful falls in all of the Santa Cruz Parks. Across from the falls is a platform with benches affording fine views and a good place to picnic. The clever hiker can have a friend drop them off at the Park Headquarters at the top of Big Basin and hike about five hours down to Waddell Beach. An afternoon bus from Waddell Beach returns to Santa Cruz. Be sure to check times and schedules before making that commitment. The ambitious hiker may take the Skyline-to-the-Sea Trail thirteen miles to the top of the basin and enjoy extravagant vistas. Big Basin is California’s oldest state park, established in 1902 to save the ancient redwood forests. The park has grown to more than 18,000 acres with more than 80 miles of trails passing among streams, waterfalls, and old-growth redwoods.
Redwoods were heavily logged in the basin by William Waddell from 1867 to 1875. Logging stopped when he was killed by a grizzly bear, and the valley became known as the canyon of the bear. Grizzly bears have not been seen in the area since the 1920s. In 1913 Theodore Hoover was able to buy much of Waddell Creek watershed. His Rancho Del Oso encompassed about 3,000 acres, reaching from the ocean to the boundary of Big Basin Redwoods State Park.
 Since that time, five generations of his family have lived here. There are still private family homes bordering the parkland. I felt a twinge of envy as we strolled past the neatly trimmed redwood homesteads of his descendants. The sun was smiling on their meadow bright with yellow wildflowers, dotted with persimmon trees heavy with orange globe. Neat rows of purple cabbage and a variety of lettuces fanned across the foothills. A thick hedge of berry bush brambles surrounded the fields to keep the deer and wild pigs from harvesting the crops.
We crossed a wooden bridge and walked beside Waddell Creek where the remains of a cement weir are used in the biological study of fish. During spring and winter months you may see mature steelhead and salmon in deep pools. President Hoover, an enthusiastic angler, fished here when he visited his brother. As a state park, the stream is now closed to fishing.

When we entered the deep redwood forest, the temperature dropped ten degrees. The cool breath of the towering monsters felt like a deep drink of soothing water. Lacy ferns nestle at the base of the trees ensconced in brilliant green moss. A gauze of Spanish moss draped the upper limbs of the evergreens. Warblers flashed through the still forest, illuminated by beams of light streaming through the protective arms overhead. I strained to see the birds I heard chirping. A kingfisher, a red-tailed hawk fat from easy pickings, and the flash of a stellar jay were all I could see.

As we were leaving, a wedge of pelican came in for a splash landing in the estuary. Curlew poked for treats in the mud at low tide. I wanted to stay longer to explore quietly on my own, but the fog was rolling in and it was time to go. I vowed to return to see the wildflowers in the spring and feel the cool forests in the summer. The constantly changing panorama of this natural wonderland is so varied it demands that the hiker come back for more.
Rancho del Oso Nature and History Center is within the coastal section of Big Basin Redwoods State ParkYou may park at Waddell Beach Park across from the trail head to Rancho Del Oso. There is parking on the surf side of the Highway. You can explore the wetlands, rocky tide pools, or hike anytime of the year.
Guided nature walks at the Rancho Del Oso Nature Center 831-427-2288
This a list of the hike options at Rancho Del Oso http://bit.ly/2jbSraL
Big Basin Redwood State Park Headquarters, where the Skyline-to Sea-Hike begins, is hosts to numerous trails spiraling throughout the redwood forest. There is also a nature museum with stuffed animal, bird, and inspect specimens on display. 
Big Basin Headquarters http://bit.ly/2ikWjlB
21600 Big Basin Way in Boulder Creek 831-338-8860

Boulder Creek, a charming village nearby Park Headquarters is a good place to stay.

 Subscribe to my blog www.LindaBallouTalkingtoyou.com and receive updates on her books, and travel destinations. I will be sharing my favorite hikes along the California Coast from Los Angeles to the Lost Coast in my California Daze Column each month.






Sunday, January 1, 2017

Triumphant Year for the" Lost Angel"

It pays to google yourself once in a while. To my delight, I discovered that I am on the list of Top Baby Boomer Blogs forSenior Adventures. As the Adventure Travel Expert on the National Associationof Baby Boomer Women, my articles are shared in many places that I have not initiated. It is fun and exciting to see how the internet works in strange and mysterious ways

 Africa has been on my list for about a decade. I finally made it in grand style this year.  The Ultimate Safari with Overseas Adventure Travel that took me to less traveled tracks in Botswana, Zimbabwe and Zambia was everything I had hoped for. I wrote half dozen articles about my time there. Here is the link to my interview on Around the World TV.Here is a link to Into the Wilds of Africa  featured in Real Travel Adventures E-zine.
Me with my favorite guide Cowboy



Collateral goodness from my journey brought me to Mat Dry, safari guide and owner of  This is Africa safaris. He gave me the most flattering review that Lost Angel Walkabout has received to date!

There is no other way to say it; Linda Ballou is an OUTSTANDING writer and an incredibly dynamic individual! Lost Angel Walkabout is about as captivating a collection of travel tales as one could hope to read..

 Mat helped me with my article The Elephant in the Room that I shared on Green Loons eco tours. I felt the need to bring awareness to an environmental problem that is not discussed because South Africans are afraid it will dissuade tourists from visiting their respective countries.
Two sides to the Elephant story


Peter Steyn, editor of Globe Rovers Magazine headquartered in Hong Kong, reached out to me on Social Media. That is one of the really fun things about my writing journey. You never know who will stumble upon one of your articles, or books and find you interesting.

This is the conversation that ensued and appeared in Globe Rovers along with the following book review of Lost Angel Walkabout. What a fun encounter. Check out his magazine for lots of great info on distant destinations for the intrepid traveler.



Stay tuned in for more adventures to come as I work on my next travel collection "The Lost Angel Rides Again", Wild Ballou Wander, ? You tell me. Cheers Linda

Armchair travel makes a great gift for your travel loving friends!!
Lost Angel Walkabout available with free shipping on my site
www.lindaballouauthor.com or all online distribution sites.